WG 13.3 and WG 13.9 Online Course on Research Methods for Human-Computer Interaction 2024

Overview

An activity of IFIP TC13 (Human Computer Interaction), Working Groups 13.3 (Human Computer Interaction, Disability and Ageing) and 13.9 (Interaction Design and Children)

IFIP WG 13.3 and WG 13.9 are organizing a series of one day online courses for PhD students and early career researchers in HCI, UX and related areas. The courses will provide an introduction to research methods in HCI and in particular working with specific user populations, for example children, people with disabilities and older people. The courses also provide an opportunity to meet other students and researchers in HCI and related areas and exchange ideas. We will set up a Slack channel to continue discussions after the courses.

Courses will take place on Zoom between 09:30 and 16:00 BST (GMT/UTC+1) on each day. PhD students and early career researchers from anywhere in the world are welcome to join (as long as you can cope with the time zone), there is no charge.

Two courses are planned:

  • 23 April 2024: Research Methods for Human Computer Interaction
  • 18 June 2024: The Challenges of Working with Specific Populations

You can sign up for one or both days, depending on your interests.

Please sign up using the EventBrite links, using your academic email address. Instructions for joining via Zoom will be sent several days before each course.

Any questions, please contact the organizers:

Helen Petrie, University of York (helen.petrie@york.ac.uk)

Gavin Sim, University of Central Lancashire (GRSim@uclan.ac.uk)

Sponsors

IFIP TC13 Logo

Courses

2024 Courses

Two courses are planned for the first half of 2024:

  • 23 April 2024: Research Methods for Human Computer Interaction
  • 18 June 2024: The challenges of Working with Specific Populations

You can sign up for one or both of these days, depending on your interests.

Please sign up using the EventBrite links, using your academic email address. Instructions for joining via Zoom will be sent several days before each course.

2024 Research Methods for Human Computer Interaction

Researchers in human-computer interaction use a wide range of methods drawn from different disciplines and often adapted to the needs of our research areas. This course will provide a framework for thinking about research methods as well as overview of some of the more popular (and some of the more unusual) research methods used in HCI. The course will provide both theoretical and practical advice. These will include both qualitative and quantitative methods, self-report and direct observation with participants. Methods to be covered will include expert evaluation methods, bespoke and standardised questionnaires including the NASA-TLX, verbal protocols, contextual inquiry, experience sampling, true experiments and the Delphi method. If there are particular methods you would like discussed, please contact the organizers as they are open to other possibilities.

Please sign up using the EventBrite link below, using your academic email address. Instructions for joining via Zoom will be sent several days before each course.

Sign up at: Eventbrite

2024 The Challenges of Working with Specific Populations

HCI researchers have a long tradition of working with a wide range of different user groups, including children, people with disabilities, older people and people from different cultures. Working with a different population from yourselves can present many challenges to researchers. The ability to work positively with diverse groups of people is a core requirement for successful research. This includes how to recruit appropriate participants, how to work with participants in respectful and successful ways, how to write respectfully about different groups and how to ensure ethical and legal considerations are followed in all cases. In this course, you will cover a wide range of concepts for conducting research with specific populations including ethics and good practice of working with children, people with disabilities and older people. In many cases standard research methods in HCI are applicable to different groups, but care needs to be taken in applying them and some adjustments may be needed to meet the differing needs of different groups. The course will provide you with theoretical underpinnings as well practical advice on how best to work with different user groups in running studies of different kinds. The course is designed for PhD students interested in working with specific user groups to encourage you to critique your approaches and practices.

Please sign up using the EventBrite link below, using your academic email address. Instructions for joining via Zoom will be sent several days before each course.

Sign up at: Eventbrite